From Football Safety to Neurosurgeon

From Football Safety to Neurosurgeon
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– [Narrator] This Great
Big Story was made possible by Wells Fargo. Established 1852, re-established 2018. (jaunty music) This is Myron. – Hi. – [Narrator] Myron is an athlete. – I played a little football in college. – [Narrator] And … – I was a Rhodes Scholar. – [Narrator] And … – I played for the NFL. – [Narrator] And … – I have a Master’s degree
in Medical Anthropology. – [Narrator] And … – And, I’m a neurosurgeon. – [Narrator] Sheesh. – My first dream was to play professional football. There’s no question. I was very active as a
young man, and I knew that I was pretty good at it. When I got to the fifth
grade, that’s when I knew I wanted to pursue my second dream. I read a book called
Gifted Hands by Ben Carson, who looked like me-he was black- who came from a similar
socioeconomic background as me. We didn’t have much money
when we left the Bahamas and came to America, and
the more I read about it the more I knew that once I
was done playing football, neurosurgery was gonna be the pathway and the second chapter of my life. I was the number one-rated
high school player in the country for
football-recruited by everyone- 83 scholarship offers. I always felt that football fed academics, academics fed football. – [Narrator] Myron spent his college years playing football and shadowing doctors. He graduated in two and a half years and was expected to be a first
or second round draft pick in the NFL with a
multi-million dollar contract, but he also had a chance to study at Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. – I ended up deciding to go to Oxford and saying no to the NFL. I spent a year and a half over there. I came back to the United States, went into the draft and got
drafted in the sixth round instead of the second or first, made $70,000 instead of six million. Played for three years, got out healthy, felt good about my time there, and, frankly, made enough money
to pay for medical school. I didn’t have any lasting concussions, and my hands were okay to where I was able to do surgery in the operating room; and so I left on my own volition. Started medical school, and here I am now. – [Narrator] Since head
injuries are common on the football field,
Myron works to impress the importance of avoiding
concussions on young players. But for Myron, his days of
tackling are behind him. – Football was great for
that season of my life, but now this is it. This is the pinnacle. This is where I belong,
and I’ve told my parents several times over and over again. They ask me, “Myron, how do you feel “what you’re doin’ now? “How do you feel?” I said, “Mommy and Daddy, I feel like this “is where I belong.” – [Patient] So, did you say
you played a sport before? – [Myron] Yes, I played football. (soft ambient music)

48 thoughts on “From Football Safety to Neurosurgeon

  1. I've accomplished a lot in my life and I plan to accomplish even more but man, hearing this story makes me want to accomplish 10x's more of what I already had planned lol. Great story

  2. Finally someone with a similar story! Fantastic.
    I also played football(right side linebacker here), have a degree in psycholoy, have also competed in MMA(welterweight and middleweight), armwrestling, and Iam a skydiver as well.
    Graduated from med. school a while back, and now working as a radiologist; so very involved with brain injury diagnosis and treatment, among other things. still active in sports though! But as every doc knows, medicine is the no.1 time-consumer professionally.

  3. So inspirational โค๏ธโค๏ธโค๏ธ May GOD CONTINUE TO BLESS ALL YOU DO! Iโ€™m a Neurosurgeon student

  4. I wondered if he really was from the Bahamas, but when he said "mummy and daddy", I knew. No matter how old we are, Bahamians ALWAYS call their parents mummy and daddy.

  5. and i was thinking to give up gym to focus more in my study then this pop up in my recommendation football player becoming a neurosurgeon ๐Ÿ‘€ such motivate man salute

  6. And im laying here in hospital, after being unable to walk because of a rare complication after a kidney transplant due to a rare mutation, now with a diagnoses of a new disease, all at the age of 25. With no job, no degree, no friends. Natural selection sucks. Good video!

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